There Are No Half Measures That Can Fix Gun Violence

The main problem with all of the proposed fixes for gun violence in the US is that only extreme measures will make any difference, and extreme measures aren’t going to fly in centrist central DC. Let’s look at the polar extreme fixes that might work: 1) Absolute totalitarianism Now hold on before you get all […]

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Keep Telling Yourself You Live in a Free Country

“Land of the free, home of the brave” doesn’t apply to the US anymore, but don’t tell that to the brainwashed sheeple still singing it at the top of their lungs. The flat fact is that we’re not brave, no matter which side of the aisle we’re cowering in. As a country, we are motivated […]

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Paying the Fee to See the Private Grave of Karl Marx

I love these kinds of stories—when the incongruity between concept and reality exposes the ideological cracks in leftist thinking. It turns out that the privately owned cemetery, Highgate Cemetery in London, where Karl Marx is buried charges a fee to see his memorial. Karl Marx, the father of communism and a zealous proponent of the […]

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Why It’s Easy to Believe in Socialism Today

It’s easy to believe in socialism in modern America. It’s easy to hear about everyone working together for the common good, the government making sure everyone plays nice, and free and affordable everything for everyone and think, “Well that sounds like a great idea.” But the only reason it is so easy to believe is […]

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The Difference Between the Lottery and Wall Street

Yesterday, I wrote an article about a deceptive shift of language from “income inequality” to “income inequity.” In it, I quoted Barack Obama, who recently claimed that hedge fund investors were the “nation’s lottery winners.” I think his dismissive assessment deserves another look, since it represents the attitude so many Americans have toward the wealthy. […]

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Income Inequality or Income Inequity? The Difference a Word Can Make

I have been noticing a trend in recent discussions of income inequality. Commentators have started replacing income inequality with income inequity. At first, I thought this subtle shift was a result of ignorance. In our word-impoverished culture, the right words get swapped for incorrect similar-sounding ones all the time (e.g., “disinterested” for “uninterested”). But as […]

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Social Security in Bigger Trouble Than We Thought

The Social Security Administration has been releasing heavily biased and overly optimistic numbers for about fifteen years, according to a new report by Harvard and Dartmouth: According to the report, the SSA’s actuarial projections in the 1980s underestimated revenues and overestimated costs by $27 billion; in the 1990s, that figure was $200 billion. Now, in […]

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